picjumbo.com_IMG_4118

Discrimination equals bullying

It started with a frustrated question as I watched my daughter throw up (again).

“Do transgender kids miss more school than their cisgender peers?”

I posted it on my personal Facebook page and a friend immediately responded that kids who are bullied tend to miss more school.

I started to type this statement: “To the best of my knowledge, Conner isn’t being bullied. I mean, she IS being discriminated against by the school system . . .,” and that’s when I stopped typing and started crying.

She IS being bullied. She’s being bullied by the school system that tells her to stand up against bullies. I never made that connection before.

“Maybe,” I thought to myself, “Maybe, I am mistaking what the word “bullying” really means.”

So, I did what anyone else would do and I googled it. This is the first definition that popped up:

Screen Shot 2015-11-02 at 10.33.59 PM

“Use superior strength or influence to intimidate someone, typically to force him or her to do what one wants. ”

That’s exactly what’s happening here.

The school system:

  1. Is not allowing her to use the girl’s bathroom
  2. Asked her not to disclose her own personal information because they weren’t educated on how to respond to questions from parents and students.
  3. Due to the former, put her in a situation where she felt like she had to lie about why she wasn’t using the girl’s bathroom so as not to get in trouble for disclosing that she was transgender.
  4. Is not creating a culture where she feels safe to openly be who she is
  5. Is not creating a culture of safety for other LGBT kids
  6. Is creating a stressful environment where she has to be the one doing the educating instead of the other way around.

I should stop and let you know that I appreciate many people in the school system who are hoping to make things better. I understood why they needed time to get educated. The school system as a whole was completely unprepared for us.

I am frustrated because they’ve known about transgender and gender non-conforming kids in the school system before we arrived and didn’t start working on changes at that point. They recognize now that they need to make changes and we are actually meeting this week to discuss where things stand and how to move forward. That’s great. I acknowledge the work being done. But, why did it take my kid (and my mouth??) to prompt these changes?

I really wish they could hear some of the conversations my daughter has had with her healthcare team. I wish they could see how stressed she gets and how it leads to throwing up. I wish they could understand the toll it takes on her to be in an environment where she is constantly wondering if she is safe. Or if she’s going to get in trouble for talking about who she is. Of being in an environment where she is doing the educating; where she is leading a culture change.

There are transgender kids in every school system across our nation. Too many times, schools are not updating their policies towards transgender kids until faced with parents who won’t go away. Too often, a child is discriminated against, which prompts the school system to realize that their policies need changed.

Why are we okay with that? Why aren’t educators leading the change here? Why are we forcing children to create their own path because one doesn’t exist for them in their school? Why are we asking children to carry the burden of educating their teachers and their peers?

Why aren’t schools creating a culture where kids feel safe to ask the tough questions? Why are the schools participating in a form of bullying because of outdated policies and lack of education?

Why??

I want to close by saying that my daughter did come out to her friends a few weeks ago. She started by asking them if they knew what transgender meant. Their response?

“Everybody knows what transgender is unless they are a baby or an old person.”

Think about that response for a second. Your child probably knows more about transgender issues than you do.

The end to that coming out story? After some typical grade school drama, her best friend said, “You can stop trying to explain because it doesn’t matter. The only thing that matters is that you are my friend.” High five to that kid. That was over a month ago and there’s been no more discussion about it because it’s not a big deal to our kids. It’s a big deal to the school.

Our children are teaching the educators if they will only stop to listen. 

Kids get it. It’s the adults who make it more complicated than it needs to be.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *